Alternative names include haversack from the German Hafersack meaning "oat sack"[1] (which more properly describes a small cloth bag on a strap worn over one shoulder and originally referred to the bag of oats carried as horse fodder), Kraxe (a German rucksack with a rigid framework), and bergen (a large load-carrying rucksack, from a design issued by the British Army during the Second World War).[2] In fact, Britons used to call Alpine-style backpacks "Bergen rucksacks", maybe from the name of their creator, Norwegian Ole F. Bergan, combined with the name of the Norwegian city of Bergen.[citation needed] https://i.pinimg.com/236x/bc/6b/e8/bc6be89939405339827bccefb4539f1d--happy-sunday.jpg
External frame packs were designed to carry heavy loads (>20 kg or 40 lb), giving the wearer more support and protection and better weight distribution than a simple, frameless strapped bag. Wooden pack frames were used for centuries around the world. Ötzi the Iceman may have used one in Copper Age Alpine Italy,[5][6] though some archaeologists believe the frame found with the body was part of a snowshoe. Such packs are common in military and mountaineering applications;[7] metal versions first appeared in the mid-20th century. https://i.pinimg.com/236x/8d/6f/87/8d6f873a5f9b925fe764eecba26a075b.jpg
Alternative names include haversack from the German Hafersack meaning "oat sack"[1] (which more properly describes a small cloth bag on a strap worn over one shoulder and originally referred to the bag of oats carried as horse fodder), Kraxe (a German rucksack with a rigid framework), and bergen (a large load-carrying rucksack, from a design issued by the British Army during the Second World War).[2] In fact, Britons used to call Alpine-style backpacks "Bergen rucksacks", maybe from the name of their creator, Norwegian Ole F. Bergan, combined with the name of the Norwegian city of Bergen.[citation needed] https://i.pinimg.com/236x/f2/81/41/f28141bfddc4735c9fdad4210c76c5ae--thirty-one--thirty-one-bags.jpg
Annmarie has also set up her page for a “Mystery Hostess Party.” Order some of the Thirty-One swag that you’ve been dying to try out from now until November 12th. Every mama that places an order will have a chance to be the “hostess” of the party. The hostess has the opportunity to get FREE Thirty-One items, half-priced items and credit to order some more of their products. Click here to RSVP and join the fun party on Facebook!  https://i.pinimg.com/236x/12/97/a4/1297a436f4dde9576a71e274270ff1c6--prom-makeup-makeup-geek.jpg
Backpacks are a standard part of the load-bearing equipment of soldiers, especially infantry, in most countries, and military-style packs are regularly available to civilians in military surplus stores. Well-known examples include the United States ALICE field pack and the British Army PLCE rucksack attachment, both of which are widely available to civilian markets both as actual military surplus (new or used) and as replicas. Such packs are often, though not always (e.g. the USMC's ILBE pack), external-frame packs, with the pack itself lashed or pinned to a metal or plastic carrying frame. For units that are entering combat situations, packs may be loaded heavily and can weigh in excess of 100 lbs. Each soldier may carry extra weapons, ammunition, rations, medical supplies, tents or other shelter material, and extra clothing.
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